Blog post on blogging

The benefits of blogging are many and diverse but now as I pause to think about it, the main one that comes to mind is the creation of a person’s online identity through persistent revelations. A series of blog posts help to make public a person’s character and situation in a way that one-off articles cannot – when presented with a collection of material contributed over time, a reader might be able to follow the progression of growth and change the author has undergone than they could if they were faced with a single article. Differences acknowledged by the author (for example, mention that they had completed a degree or moved into a new job) as well as differences evident but not mentioned (for example, alterations in the style or quality it of writing) combine to create an image of the author that matures along with the reader. This development over time creates a narrative for the reader to follow and allows them to feel closer to the author for having seen their history and where they came from instead of just their current status.

It could be argued that one long article may demonstrate more of the author’s personal development than several small articles and this may be true, but long articles raise the problem of actually getting readers to read to the end. In a world where time is increasingly precious, I suggest that readers are more likely to read short articles over several brief sessions than they are to read a very long article on once only basis.

Actually, the breaking down of information is one of the things I noticed that made other people’s blogs easier to read. Sacha Chua and Dion Hinchcliffe (each a prominent identity in the world of Web 2.0 and Enterprise 2.0 bloggers) both seem to favour short paragraphs and dot-point-style formats over ‘wall of text’ styles. I find this approach much nicer to read as it simplifies and minimises the content for me so I don’t have to synthesise verbose writing for myself.

Another thing I noticed about Sacha Cuha’s blog is that it had lots of links – links to similar bloggers, links that made it easy to follow her on other platforms and links to her other blog posts (both to single posts and to categories of posts). This made going deeper into the material she has published much easier because the reader can hop to related posts instead of having to trawl through all of them sequentially.

It also occurs to me that blogging, when done frequently, can help keep the author fresh in their reader’s mind. Infrequent long articles mean that the author is only occasionally directing attention back to themselves, whereas more active blogs maintain the author’s presence in their reader’s daily life.

Advertisements

2 Responses to “Blog post on blogging”

  1. Hisham Beshayer Says:

    Hey, interesting blog post. Your observations of Sacha Chua’s blog were very thought provoking. You made me notice things I didn’t notice such as the short paragraphs and dot point style. I will be sure to incorporate some of your ideas in my future blog posts. Please visit my blog and comment if you have the time. (http://www.beshayer.com).

  2. Carl Rogers Says:

    I think you are right with your observation:

    A series of blog posts help to make public a person’s character and situation in a way that one-off articles cannot – when presented with a collection of material contributed over time, a reader might be able to follow the progression of growth and change the author has undergone than they could if they were faced with a single article.

    I wonder how many people will do this though … For me, one of the concerns of public blogging is that a flippant, light hearted or ironic comment made now could be taken out of context some time in the future. I fear that we are often too quick to jump to criticise rather than more patiently attempting to understand the broader context in which a comment of observation was made.

    Given that our digital footprints will follow us wherever we go … I wonder if we will become more or less accepting of comments made or positions adopted in the past, that may have now changed.

    Cheers,
    Carl

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s


%d bloggers like this: